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involved in the joint priorities, a euphemism for the u.s. the assassination liz in afghanistan. there are many events associated with that, some that resulted in the deaths of -- one that resulted in the deaths of seven children and others that results in a number of innocent. we can also see how people get on the list. they seem to be recommended by regional governors in afghanistan or by intelligence authorities, often with little evidence and no judicial review. >> you said you intend to cooperate. >> that is one of the interesting journalistic stories, that we manage to pull together these groups to share investigative resources. we shared resources stemming out of this material to deal with this. as equal partners, with the exception that we control the embargo data and could move that back in fourth. i spoke to nick davis, and then we did it between the editors. >> they modine this morning -- mod this morning are saying even they are unable to deliver these documents. how can you say it is accurate, and if some of it is not, doesn't that eat into your legitimacies? >> if
. >>> tonight on "nightline" -- leaky secret. it's the biggest leak in u.s. military history. 92,000 classified reports on the war in afghanistan. posted on the internet for all to see. we sit down with wikileak's founder to find out why he thinks it's a public service to public what was once top secret. >>> the bottom line -- with the market for diapers worth $7 billion, it's no surprise that diaper companies have swaddling bottoms down to a science. tonight, we visit the closely guarded lab -- yes, diaper lab -- where scientists, engineers and seamstresses work to create the perfect nappy. >>> and stepping up -- he's a star in limbo. the gray area between tween heartthrob and full-on sex symbol. tonight, we go on the town with zac efron as he attempts to go through hollywood's sometimes treacherous waters. >>> good evening, i'm terry mor moron. it's the biggest leak in u.s. military history. 92,000 classified documents published on the website wikileaks. it paints a picture of a war gone wrong in afghanistan. details corruption in the afghan government and pakistani support for
. this is a major source of hostility to isaf and u.s. forces. >>> u.s. and south korean war sxhpz helicopters are carrying out maneuvers off the korean peninsula. the media was shown some of the exercises on monday. on the second day of the four-day drill, earl morning aircraft staged takeoffs and landings on the "uss george washington." refueling activities were also shown. the large scale war game involves 200 aircraft and submarines. it focuses on detecting submarines and destroying torpedos in the event of an enemy attack. the exercise is apparently a warning to north korea in the wake of the sinking of a south korean naval ship in march. north korea strongly protested against the exercise and threatened to counter with a nuclear test. >>> japanese scientists say they have found a safer way to create a type of human stem cell known as ips. it has the potential to develop into any tissue or organ. ips cells are generated by introducing three or four different genes to human somatic cells, but one of those genes is believed to be potentially cancerous. a team of kyoto university researchers
documents raise serious questions about the war in afghanistan and whether a key u.s. ally is helping the enemy. i'm katie couric. also tonight an exclusive cbs news interview with the president of iran. mahmoud ahmadinejad denies he's aiding the taliban and accuses president obama of snubbing him. a shake-up is expected to put an american in charge of b.p. while tony heyward could walk away with an ocean of severance pay. and steve hartman takes the temperature of the nation and finds we're running hot. >> i wish it were winter. >> reporter: and cold. >> i love the heat. captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news world headquarters in new york, this is the "cbs evening news" with katie couric. >> couric: good evening, everyone. the obama administration is dealing with a serious breach of national security tonight. tens of thousands of classified documents about the war in afghanistan leaked and posted on the web. at a time when more than 60% of americans believe the war is not going well, the documents provide some evidence to back that up. more than 91,000 were leaked to wikileaks.or
's intelligence service is directly helping the taliban that is killing u.s. soldiers in afghanistan. white house correspondent is at the pentagon tonight with the details. u.s. officials are assessing the damage after the leak of 91,000 classified from january of 2004 to december of 2009. the information released by an antiwar website is described by the military as "secret battlefield reports," which are critical of pakistan intelligence helping the insurgency suggesting that taliban have been equipped with missiles and contain information of civilian casualties. at the white house an effort to say that while there are national security concerns about the massive leak, there is nothing terribly new. >> the content as much as it is their names, their operations, logistics, sources, all of that information out in a public way has the potential to do harm. >> the u.s. has expressed anger at pakistan for allowing al qaeda and taliban to have safe haven on the soil and frustration not not taking the fight to them but the former head of the c.i.a. says the u.s. wanted too much. >> for us to expect th
. the u.s. government has condemned the leaking of tens of thousands of classified documents on the conflict in the afghanistan, saying it could threaten national security. they were published on the internet by wikileaks, which is an organization that specializes in publishing anonymous sensitive documents. >> there are reports from the from lines and have set on the afghan conflict. -- from the front lines and have sensitive information on the conflict. the leader of the taliban is a list of ordering attacks. the documents could be the tip of the iceberg. >> they do not include most reports from u.s. special forces. they do not include report by the cia. they do not include reports by other coalition bodies. but they do include the majority of regular u.s. army activity. >> the news out let that had access to the documents said that the u.s. special forces units had targets to be killed bin areas controlled by german troops. it insists it is not involved in targeted killings. >> the purpose of the list is to identify insurgents. our exports -- our special forces with of the
on all that's gone wrong. mounting u.s. casualties, civilian casualties, afghan government corruption and claims that pakistan is helping the taliban. >> the fact is the revelation of these documents, these raw reports real he'll brings to the foreall of the core challenges that we've been facing in afghanistan for a number of years. >> reporter: the war funding bill now goes to the president for his signature, but it only funds the war for a few months so another big battle over paying for the war in afghanistan is just around the corner, katie. >> couric: this question probably reflects what a lot of americans are wondering given the fact that the u.s. gives pakistan billions of dollars in aid every year. that is, can pakistan even be called a partner at this point? >> well, despite all those claims in the wikileaks documents the white house says yes. number one they say because relations have improved significantly over the last year. number two, they say because no other country has done as much to help the united states eliminate al qaeda terrorists from the battlefield. katie. >
.org. and they have more. some of the documents ripped the cover off the u.s.-led war effort in afghanistan. they tell a story that some veterans of the region know full well. more civilian deaths than are ever reported, unexplained american deaths, questionable battlefield tactics and a mission just not going that well. this comes just as the u.s., of course, is gearing up this new push in the conflict. we have two reports to start off with tonight. first, our pentagon correspondent jim miklaszewski. jim, good evening. >> reporter: good evening, brian. this massive leak provides incredible detail and insight into the u.s. war in afghanistan. day by day, battle by battle it's a tough look at the worst of the war. the staggering mountain of documents, nearly 92,000, covers a six-year stretch of the war ending last december when the u.s. war effort was failing and the taliban was on the rise. the secret documents were released by the whistleblower website wikileaks and its founder, julian assange. >> the real story of this material is that it's war. it's one damn thing after another. it is the continuou
. president obama led a chorus of concern over the huge disclosure of classified u.s. military documents about the war in afghanistan. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight, two takes on the document dump. first, senators jack reed and kit bond assess what it could mean for the war effort. >> lehrer: then, judy woodruff talks to david leigh of the "guardian" and media watcher alex jones on the journalism impact. >> ifill: holly pattenden of "business monitor international" in london looks at the corporate shake-up at b.p. >> lehrer: tom bearden reports from the alabama gulf coast on kenneth feinberg and the complicated mission of compensation. >> and the lead is still tied up they still compensation hasn't been forth coming. >> when i was a young person working in these places, didn't see a way out. and i certainly didn't think the way out would be this. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corpor
with the advocacy group, invisible children. this senseless act of violence should serve as a wake-up call to u.s. officials on the need to vigorously address the threat of islamist extremism wherever it lurks. which extends far beyond the middle east. many more lives are at stake. the 1998 east africa embassy attacks exposed and the july 11 kampala attacks affirmed that the united states cannot afford to ignore the activities of extremist groups in africa as they attempt to expand their influence to bolster their ranks and spread their dangerous ideology. we must work vigilantly and cooperatively with other responsible nations to disrupt the operations of extremist groups and hold accountable their regional sponsors. over 18 months ago, mr. speaker, i introduced a resolution, h.con.res. 16, which brings sorely needed attention to the threat of islamic extremism in africa. it is alarming that even after these tragic attacks i have not been able to get the majority to bring this resolution to the floor. i understand that attorney general holder is currently in uganda attending the african union su
. >>> in other news, in afghanistan this morning, nato confirmed it has recovered the body of a u.s. navy sailor killed in a taliban ambush. he's identified as petty officer justin mcneley, age 30, the nephew of a colorado state legislator. he was one of two americans who went missing on friday. their shot-up vehicle found 80 miles south of kabul. the taliban claimed they captured the other sailor alive. >>> also this morning, continued fallout from a nato air strike friday in southern afghanistan. nato command is denying afghan government claims that the helicopter attack killed 52 civilians. a nato spokesman says it investigated the incident and found that six taliban fighters were killed, but no civilians. >>> in washington, the obama administration is in full damage control mode following that huge leak of military secrets. more than 90,000 field reports from u.s. troops in afghanistan were released by the wikileaks website which says it will post even more soon. david martin reports. >> reporter: most of the reports document what is already well known. for years the u.s. has not had enough
will also be live in the gulf of mexico to get live reaction. >> thank you, david. the u.s. military in iraq has been strongly criticized for failing to account properly for billions of dollars received to help build the country. a federal watchdog says that 96% of the funds are unaccounted for. i asked our correspondent about how much money is missing. >> $8.7 billion according to this report here. the u.s. apartment of the fence 's financial management control was unable to properly account for $8.7 billion out of $9.1 billion for funds received it for development in iraq. this was money that came from the proceeds of the sale of iraqi oil and gas and some from the frozen assets of the saddam hussein era. submitted between 2004 and 2007 for reconstruction projects. >> nato forces in afghanistan have recovered the remains of one of two american servicemen that when missing last friday after driving out of the military base without an escort. afghan officials said that negotiations are still ongoing for the release of the second man. >> negotiation, since the capture of the men on friday, ha
been firing heat-seeking surface-to-air-missiles at nato and u.s. heblgt hechts. we hear the civilian death toll is of higher than reported by military troops in the field. there's a shadowy covert operation going on to kill taliban leaders. a shoot to kill by a group call ed task force 37 3. and that the pakistan's isi has been helping the taliban kill u.s. troops and others, larry. >> larry: is all this new to you, nick? >> you know, a lot of this we've heard before. one analyst put it this way to me. he said, this is old bad news at a new bad time. what he means is we've heard a lot of this before, but it comes at a very, very difficult moment. some of these allegations, the allegations of pakistani intelligence services, aiding the taliban, we've heard details about that before. we've heard details, speculation that the civilian death toll is much higher than has been initially reported. but it's the timing that it comes at, when there are so many questions about the war in afghanistan, and it is in the granular detail in all these documents that people are only now just beginning
of 91,000 reports on the events that intern lit u.s. military considered significant. >> robert gibbs at the white house and others at the pentagon, robert gates, have said this has the potential to harm u.s. service people. does that concern you? >> well, anything in theory has boat tension to harm anything else but we have looked that the material for some months now together with our media partners. we have taken some steps to understand that material is at least seven months ago, so, it is -- it is not of any sort of a tactical significance. our primary concern with people being potentially harmed was to do with afghan informants who could have been under the risk of retribution action. that is why we held back some 15,000 reports for a more detailed review. >> there is a lot of questions your view toward the war. you were quoted saying you enjoyed crushing bastards. is that an accurate reflection of your attitude toward the establishment, toward the people running the war, toward the u.s. government? >> well, wikileaks is a publication by the sunshine press. we are an organizatio
>>> developing news out of afghanistan. the body of one of two missing u.s. sailors is found. we'll have the latest on the search for the second sailor. >> medical marijuana delivered to your doorstep. the delivery guy running for public office. >> good morning. i'm laura garcia-cannon. >> i'm brent cannon. meteorologist rob mayeda joining us now. >> good morning to you. kind of like yesterday morning. we have all these overcast skies and drizzle on the coast. if you're traveling over the summit highway, you will run into low clouds into livermore. i noticed temperatures through the afternoon, we'll get sunshine inland. 60s and 70 inland. pretty incredible for this time of year. if you want to find warmer weather, the end of the weekend and weekend should be make you happier. temperatures starting to climb mid to upper 80s inland. >> we want to say good morning to mike. >> out to fremont, southbound 880 just past central, there is an accident there still in the lanes southbound side. had all but one lane blocked. not a lot of activity. just a truck and smashed-up car on the siste
livable. i also wanted to move this project for another reason, which is important to u.s. dot. that reason is we are involving a number of small and disadvantaged businesses, a key goal of u.s. dot. you see the new equipment here. that is simply because of the investment small businesses are able to make because of the recovery act. it is critical that small business is also a part of -- not just sharing in the economy -- by helping us to recover from an economic standpoint. let me close with a few words about our main priority as u.s. dot, and that is safety. we have many projects across the country that are underway and we need to be extra careful when driving through work zones. we want to make sure that men and women building the infrastructure are safe, and that is important for all of us. i would ask you to please keep that in mind. whenever you are behind the wheel, please turn off your cell phone and pay attention to your driving. i were transportation secretary ray lahood is leading a national effort to bring attention to the dangerous act of talking while driving. in
't even written in the constitution. the responsibility of how we run our foreign affairs is with the u.s. congress, and when we go to war it it should be a congressional function, not an executive function, and someday we may get there but right now today we have to do our very best to let people know the shortcomings of the policy we're following in pakistan. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentlewoman from florida. ms. ros-lehtinen: mr. speaker, i'm so honored to yield such time as he may consume to the distinguished gentleman from indiana, mr. burton, the ranking member on the foreign affairs subcommittee on the middle east and south asia. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from indiana is recognized. mr. burton: i thank the gentlelady for yielding, and i'd like to remind my colleagues who are so hell-bent to get the training troops that we have, 230 u.s. troops helping with the training in pakistan out of pakistan. i'd like to remind them on 9/11 we were attacked by al qaeda terrorists whose head was osama bin laden, and osama bin laden has been goi
. host: the debate over u.s. strategy in afghanistan is back on the front page this morning, following the leak of those wikileak documents -- one legislator says these documents call into question several things, and an investigation is likely to follow. meanwhile, slated to vote on $37 billion in emergency supplemental money for the war. the leak could complement that. we want your thoughts this morning on the leak. here are the lines. we will get to those phone calls in just a minute. on the house but, that $37 billion supplemental amount, senator dennis whose image is circulating a letter asking congressional members to vote against the supplemental funding. "the washington post" this morning says that official leaks will not alter views. they know that republicans have been largely silent. perhaps because the bulk of documents concerned the war effort during the george w. bush administration. lawmakers said the trove of documents may harden opposition, but is unlikely to suddenly alter impressions of a war the administration had previously acknowledged is tough amid declining publ
.p. began polluting the gulf of mexico and u.s. coastline, the company has a new leader and new strategy. the company's new chief executive, bob dudley, said change is coming, even though he's a longtime b.p. insider. >> we're going to learn a lot, and the industry's going to learn a lot, and there's no question that we will change as a company and from those learnings. >> reporter: included in those changes is an accelerated plan to raise cash by selling b.p.'s non-core assets, or less than 10% of the company's total business. the company is guessing it will need $32 billion to cover costs and liabilities from the spill, well below some worst-case estimates of $60 billion. still, analyst cathy milostan says, by disposing of assets b.p. hopes to show investors it can pay for the mess. >> we're starting to see what i call building blocks of being able to demonstrate that there is cash that they can access to cover oil spill costs. the issue here is, there's still a good deal of uncertainty as to what the future costs could be. that uncertainty continues to dog b.p.'s stock. the shares hav
negligence. if they are wrong about this, an additional $15 billion in penalties will be payable to the u.s. government. >> one of the criticisms is that after the explosion, you were focused on the financial impact and not on the human tragedy of the individuals that lost their lives. >> in every crisis, there are things that could have been done differently. i am sure that we can look back and we can learn from this. >> no questions at all, please. >> if a man on the right cannot answer questions, many who have their stake in the company through their pension fund should worry. >> the u.n.'s former chief weapons inspector has told the iraq inquiry here in britain that the bush administration invaded by iraq because they were high on the idea of the invasion. there is in question, the judgment of george bush and tony blair. he said that should have realized that their intelligence sources were fopoor. >> he was a swedish lawyer and diplomat sent to look for weapons of mass destruction. he ended up being caught between saddam hussein's innovation and the impatience of george bush. today, he
will be payable to the u.s. government. >> one of the criticisms is that, after the explosion, you were a bit to focus on the financial impact and not on the human tragedy of the individuals who lost their lives. >> in every crisis, there are things of that i could have done differently. once we are through all of this, we can look back and draw conclusions and learn from this. >> no questions at all, please. >> if the blow on the right cannot answer questions about the bp future, maybe those who have pension funds should worry. >> another story that involves bp, the u.s. senate committee investigating the release of the only man convicted of the lockerbie bombing has put off the hearing is scheduled for thursday. robert menendez, who was about to take care, has announced the postponement because key witnesses have refused to appear. he was very critical. >> it is utterly disappointing. it is pretty outrageous that's none of the key witnesses will cooperate with our request to answer questions before the senate foreign relations committee. the have stonewalled. each side has claimed innocence
in afghanistan. >> but the gritty details from six years of war is rattling the already shaky support for the u.s. campaign. john hendren joins us now from washington with the latest. good morning, john. >> reporter: good morning, vinita. good morning, rob. the head of the website, wikileaks, says what he likes to do is crush those who abuse their power. but the pentagon says when it comes to leaked documents in the war in afghanistan, what they're doing is endangering national security. the sheer scope of the leak is unprecedented. >> there's names. there's operations. there's logistics. there's sources. >> reporter: the biggest security breach in u.s. military history. 92,000 classified documents, published on the website wikileaks. the leaked records detail missions gone horfully wrong. helicopters shot down. and allies, the pakistanis, playing a deadly double-cross with the americans. all of it setting off alarm bells in washington. >> it poses a very real and potential threat to those who are working hard to keep us safe. >> reporter: 180 of the dispatches suggest pakistan's military intelli
responsible for publishing the leaks says he's exposing u.s. war crimes. the white house says he's putting lives at risk. mark matthews is here now with more on the bay area reporter involved in bringing all of this to light. mark? >> this is being called one of the biggest intelligence breeches in u.s. history. 92,000 leaked reports, six years of classified records depicting a messy and brutal struggle in afghanistan. the information leaked includes reports the taliban are using heat-seeking missiles and that pakistan's military spy agency is in league with afghan insurgents including taliban. and accepting billions of dollars in u.s. aid. >> it's posing a real and potential threat to those working hard every day. >> the reports were first posted on wiki leaks, a whistle-blower web site. the information believed to be army specialist brad manning a 35-year-old analyst now in jail in kuwait. the founder of wiki links says there is no public evidence manning is the source. >> as far as we're able is that it's not that he is the source of the material. >> the computer hacker turning in manni
of confidence. u.s. allies wondering if the united states can keep secrets in the middle of the war. here is what the white house spokesman had to say about that. >> besides being against the law, it has the potential to be very harmful to those that are in our military, those that are cooperating with our military, and those that are working to keep us safe. >> now, the white house had accused wikileaks of being against the war effort. the u.s. policy in afghanistan. but its founder says they scrutinized this information before releasing it. >>> we have tried hard to make sure this material does not put innocents at harm. all the material is over seven months old, so it's of no current operational consequence. >> reporter: and none of this expected to impact the passage of a $60 billion funding bill on capitol hill. lynn? >> tracie potts for us in washington. tracie, thank you. >>> well, bp confirmed this morning that tony hayward is stepping down as ceo. starting on october 1st, hayward will be replaced by american bob dudley. under the terms of his contract, hayward will receive one ye
. live from our studio in washington. tonight, iranian president, ahmadinejad is accusing the u.s. and israel of preparing a military strike against at least two countries in the middle east in coming weeks. talking to state-run television today, ahmadinejad said that the logic world leaders are using to try to get iran to negotiate about the nuclear program through sanctions is "just a failure." hour, in that same interview, the iranian president said his country is now ready to sit down for new talks without preconditions in september. a mixed message, to say the least. in an exclusive interview with me today, israeli defense minister responded directly. i asked him, first, for the response to this ahmadinejad statement references the u.s. and israel: "they have decided to lunch attacks when the next three months on two countries in our region on at least two countries." including the second one, well, i don't know, i cannot explain and do not understand what he said. he is telling the world we cannot coerce anyone into anything. (inaudible) i prefer not to judge him upon what
is going badly. so what do the documents actually say? "the new york times" was the only u.s. paper to publish the store prip here's my cyst of some of the most surprising items in this report. number one, it reports high-ranking members of the pakistani spy agency met with taliban officials and actually helped organize attacks against americans. pakistan, that's supposed to be our ally, right? number two. the situation on the ground is more grim than what we've been hearing from washington. number three, the taliban is better armed than we've been led to believe. in fact, the "times" reports they've actually been using heat-seeking missiles against allied aircraft, weapons used, as you recall, by the mujahidin against the soviets when they kicked their butts. four, the "times" reports on equipment shortages, specifically american vehicles. and five, a strain between american forces and their afghan counterparts. our next guest spent a lot of time in afghanistan since 9/11. he's currently part of a company that's working over there. he's also running as a republican for senate in th
documents detailing five years of u.s. war efforts in afghanistan. >> brown: and i'm jeffrey brown. on the newshour tonight, authors steve coll and phil smucker assess what the secret material says about the conduct of the war. >> woodruff: phil shenon of the "daily beast" updates us on what is wikileaks and who is behind it. >> brown: fred de sam lazaro reports on the first sentence handed down by a war crimes tribunal to a member of cambodia's "killing fields" regime. >> woodruff: john merrow wraps up his series about the top to bottom efforts by a school superintendent to reform the new orleans public education system after hurricane katrina. >> making promises, talking publicly about all the big changes he's going to make in the schools. well, it's been three years, time for paul vallas's report card. >> brown: and we look at the impact of the americans with disabilities act on this, the 20th anniversary of the law. >> he didn't come because politicians thought it was a good idea. it came because people with disabilities fought and said we're going to be equal. we're going to
,951 miles, the entire u.s./mexican border. so that's one-third of the border has this fence. so the way to compare it, if you have a fence in your backyard, and only covers a third of your backyard, things are going to get in and out and that's what proponents are saying, they want more fence, a stronger fence. so we kind of did a story of what it's like along the border. and what we found with no knowledge at all about how to sneak into a country, we found it was very easy to go back and forth between mexico and the ups at various points. not only where the fence is, because people climb over the fence, they weld holes through the fence, go under the fence, but we found points where you just walk around the fence. and while there are certainly hard-working border patrol agents everywhere and technology and also mountainous terrain, it's very easy for a novice, such as me, to go around the fence and go back and forth between the country. so there are a number of people here in arizona who are telling us, listen, we support this law that takes effect thursday, but perhaps we wouldn't nee
death rate. pakistan denied the accusation. the u.s. state department says the documents do not represent what is currently going on. >> the fact that these are several years old, does not change our concern that this action risks our national security. the white house says -- wicki says it has another 15,000 jobs for future release. >> the war funding bill creates a dip lem ma for those opposed in the war. the bill is set to come up for a vote before congress leaves at the end of this week for its six-week summer recess. >>> city officials in san jose want to put a measure on the november ballot that would seek approval for a 10% tax on medical marijuana. if approved, the 10% tax would be highest marijuana tax in the state. opponents of the plan say the tax would put an undue burden on marijuana patients. the san jose city council is set to discuss the matter. the deadline to get this on the ballot is august 3rd. >>> the price of gas is up but only slightly in the last week. the latest survey from triple-a shows the national average is 2.74. that's an increase of about 2- c
, build its reputation back in the u.s. >> jim, how significant is it that bp is naming an american to head the company? >> reporter: i think it's very significant, bob dudley's been around for a very long time. he was at amoco, if you recall amoco was taken over by bp in a merger in 1998. he went to -- grew up in mississippi so he knows that region very well. he has been in the gulf on and off during this whole oil spill. went to smu, university of illinois. so he is very much well known in the u.s. and they are hoping that as this first non-british ceo that he can repair bp's damage. he's got a on in his hands, as you say. they are setting aside $32.5 billion to clean up the oil spill. there will probably need to be more money as well. there is the issue of selling more than $30 billion worth of u.s. assets. that will be one of the many things on bob dudley's plate. >> jim boulden in london, thank you so much. >>> in 25 minutes we'll get a never-before-seen interview with outgoing ceo tony hayward, conducted in the early days of the disaster in the gulf. david matti intingly is pr
of confidence from the allies who frankly think the u.s. can't keep secrets anymore. the founder of wikileaks said this information should not damage the war effort. >> we have tried hard to make sure that this material does not put innocence at harm. all the material is over seven months old, so it's ott nof current operational consequence. >> and we're told, lynn, that none of this is expected to affect the passage here on capitol hill of a 60 billion dollar war bill. >>> bp confirmed this morning that tony hayward is stepping down as ceo. starting on october 31st he'll be replaced by bob dudley. under the terms of his contract he'll receive one year's salary in lieu of notice amounting to $1.6 million. today's announcement was made at the same time the oil giant reported a $17 billion loss for the second quarter, a sharp reversal from the company's $6 billion earnings in the first quarter. >>> well, singer wyclef jean. he has not made a final decision, still the grammy winning artist has reportedly filled out the necessary paperwork to enter the race. there has been speculation over jean's
else, the largest leak of wartime documents in this country since the vietnam war. more than 90,000 u.s. government documents obtained and posted by the website wikileaks over the weekend. the last time there was a leak of this volume, it precipitated a full-on war between the "new york times" and the nixon white house. it was, of course, the leaking of the pentagon papers during the vietnam war by u.s. military analyst named daniel elsburg back in 1971. the pentagon papers was a touch stone that helped turn the public against vietnam war. the 90,000 plus documents posted by kwikileaks are different than the pentagon papers in that they're snap shots of the war over the last six years, as opposed a top-down study initiated in washington. the wikileaks documents are raw intelligence, threat analysis as seen through the eyes of the soldier fighting the war. as opposed an analytical view of the war from policymakers. in that sense wikileaks is no pentagon papers, but there is a glaring pair lil lel between the two that can't be ignored. these wikileaks documents have been notable in that t
. >> that was teresa garcia reporting. >> u.s. education department named california one of 19 finalists in the second round of competition to reform schools. it offers $3 billion in grants. california got nothing in the first round. it since made new commitments to improve strugglg schools and improve the gap. obama administration has been fighting for teacher pay and for teacher nure and expand charter schools. >> gubernatorial candidate meg whitman is locked in a tight battle with the governor but they are asking about her future plans. >> if you win at the november you are at the top of the republican party. ever thought about running for the white use? >> no. i am here to run california. i want to fix california. where california goes does the country. >> the former ceo appeared on "good morning ameca" today. she says the focus is helping california out of the recession. state's unemployment rate is 12.3%. she has spent $90 million and mostf it was her own money. she faces jerry brown in the general election. if brown wins in november it would be the third time elected to the sta's top post. >> a
for the worst disaster in u.s. oil history, posting a record $17 billion loss, in only three months' time. wow, that is not easy to do. now it will sell some assets to cover cost and obligations in the gulf which are plenty. stuart varney, stuart, good morning to you, what are they going to sell? >> they're going to sell smaller, older oil fields to the value of $30 billion. that's how much money they're going to need to bring in to stop paying for the cleanup. so bp the company is the obvious financial loser at first glance. look deeper, the u.k. government is also a big loser, it will take in about $10 billion less in tax from bp over the next four years. shareholders, they're also losers here, there are going to be no dividend payments at leastum next year. now, tony hayward, you could obviously say he's a loser in the sense he's lost his job and certainly his reputation but he leaves financially in tact. he will take with him to russia is a job, a -- 1 million pounds, $1.6 million in salary, his pension fund of roughly 17, $18 million will be available to him in full in two years, when he
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